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Concorde


Concorde
The world’s only ever-supersonic passenger aircraft is an incredible example of aviation engineering and technology In 1971 the skies of Britain were dominated by the sound of sonic booms. These were the results of a futuristic Anglo-French project known as Concorde. After 5,000 hours worth of testing (making it the most tested aircraft of all time), it was ready. Seating 100 people, Concorde represented the next step in commercial travel. It was so fast that it still holds the record for the shortest transatlantic crossing, a scintillating 2 hours 52 minutes and 59 seconds. The aircraft accomplished this by utilising ‘reheat’ technology, which injects extra fuel at takeoff. This innovative technology helped the Concorde fly around the globe in 1992, on the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ journey. It managed to complete the journey in just under 33 hours.


Concorde

The Concorde’s final flight was on 24 October 2003, when it was discontinued after a series of faults that ended in disaster in 2000 when it crashed, killing 113 people. The Concorde made a total of 50,000 flights for 2.5 million passengers and despite its retirement, is still held in high regard as an icon of aviation and there are still calls to bring it back the world’s only ever supersonic passenger airline back into service.