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The Ancient Celts


The Ancient Celts
How the Iron Age revolutionised this pre-Roman civilization
The discovery of how to extract iron from its ore changed the world. As the Iron Age was born, new tools could be made for warfare, agriculture, hunting and fishing. Among the main beneficiaries of this new age were the  Celts. The Iron Age in Europe lasted from 800 BCE until 43 CE and signalled a significant  development of society.

Ploughs, scythes and sickles were fashioned to tend to and gather crops. Rotary querns were  introduced to turn grain into flour and hunting tools became sharper and tougher. With iron, an array of swords, helmets and armour could also be fashioned. Clothing accessories  developed too, with the creation of iron brooches and torcs.
The Celts lived in small farming communities, often in hill forts for protection. The houses had that ched roofs and one of the biggest settlements in Britain was Colchester, believed to be the  oldest town in Britain. If there was any negative aspect to living in the Iron Age it would definitely be their medicine.  Still very primitive and led primarily by druids, one of the only surgical operations was the  trepanning procedure.
Headaches were believed to come from evil spirits so if you were feeling under the weather, a hole  was drilled into your skull to release the demons. With the coming of the Iron Age and sharper,  tougher tools, archeological evidence has shown that this gruesome practice was still popular. It seems the Celts had an obsession with the human head. They believed the head harboured the soul and that’s why, after a victorious  battle, they would cut off the heads of fallen enemies and display them on their houses, both as bragging rights and as a scare technique to warn anyone who messed with them.

The Ancient Celts