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What’s Inside A Dinosaur Egg?


What’s Inside A Dinosaur Egg?
 What came first – the dinosaur or the egg? We’re not entirely sure, but what we do know is that these great reptiles laid eggs just like chickens do. Inside the shell of a hen’s egg, chicks are able to grow before they’re ready to hatch. That’s just how the dinosaurs were born.

We know that baby dinosaurs were made this way because we have found lots of evidence. Fossilised dinosaur eggs have been found at over 200 places across the world. They tell a story about how the dinosaur made its nest, laid its eggs and how baby dinosaurs were born.
A crew of palaeontologists exploring Mongolia in 1923 were the first to scientifically recognise fossilised dinosaur eggs for what they were. Since then many dinosaur nesting sites for many different species have been uncovered all around the world. The oldest known dinosaur eggs and embryos date back to the Early Jurassic (about 190 million years ago) and come from the Massospondylus, a bipedal, omnivorous prosauropod.
Egg Mountain in Montana, USA is the site of one of the most famous dinosaur nest discoveries. Maiasaura remains were found near a nest with the remains of eggshells and babies too large to be hatchlings and this is the reason why Maiasaura is known as “caring mother lizard”. Maiasaura and many other species of dinosaur, raised their young in nest colonies. This relfected the way that they herded when on the move. This amazing discovery was the first proof that dinosaurs raised and fed their young, rather than leaving hatchlings to fend for themselves like modern turtles do. Nests contained approximately 30-40 eggs and were not incubated by the parent sitting on them, but by the heat produced from rotting vegetation placed in the nest. It’s thought that Maiasaura hatchlings left the nest after a year or two of rapid growth.

What’s Inside A Dinosaur Egg?