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Showing posts with label AnatomyPhysiology. Show all posts
Showing posts with label AnatomyPhysiology. Show all posts

Thursday, April 8, 2021

Skull of Newborn Anatomy

Skull of Newborn Anatomy

Skull of Newborn Anatomy


Skull of Newborn Anatomy


Lateral view : Sphenoidal fontanelle, Frontal bone, Squamous part, Supraorbital notch (foramen), Ethmoid bone, Anterior ethmoidal foramen, Orbital plate, Lacrimal bone, Nasal bone, Maxillary bone, Infraorbital foramen, Zygomatic bone, Zygomaticofacial foramen, Palatine bone, Pyramidal process. Parietal bone, Parietal eminence, Squamous suture, Posterior fontanelle, Lambdoid suture, Occipital bone.
Foramina and Canals of Cranial Base: Inferior View Anatomy

Foramina and Canals of Cranial Base: Inferior View Anatomy

Foramina and Canals of Cranial Base: Inferior View Anatomy


Foramina and Canals of Cranial Base: Inferior View Anatomy

Incisive fossa, Greater palatine foramen, Foramen ovale, Foramen spinosum, Tympanic branch of glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) Inferior tympanic canaliculus, Chorda tympani of intermediate nerve (CN VII), Mastoid canaliculus, Mastoid foramen, Jugular fossa, Hypoglossal canal, Foramen magnum, Nasopalatine nerve
Cranial Base: Superior View Anatomy

Cranial Base: Superior View Anatomy

Cranial Base: Superior View Anatomy


Cranial Base: Superior View Anatomy
Frontal bone ( Groove for superior sagittal sinus, Frontal crest, Groove for anterior meningeal vessels, Foramen cecum, Superior surface of orbital part). Ethmoid bone, Crista galli, Cribriform plate. Sphenoid bone, Lesser wing, Anterior clinoid process, Greater wing, Groove for middle meningeal vessels (frontal branches), Yoke, Prechiasmatic groove, Tuberculum sellae, Hypophyseal fossa, Dorsum sellae, Posterior clinoid process, Carotid groove (for int. carotid a.), Clivus.

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

Cranial Base: Inferior View Anatomy

Cranial Base: Inferior View Anatomy

Cranial Base: Inferior View Anatomy


Cranial Base: Inferior View Anatomy
Maxillary bone: Incisive fossa, Palatine process, Intermaxillary suture, Zygomatic process. Zygomatic bone, Frontal bone, Sphenoid bone ( Pterygoid process, Hamulus, Medial plate, Pterygoid fossa, Lateral plate, Scaphoid fossa, Greater wing, Foramen ovale, Foramen spinosum, Spine). Temporal bone ( Zygomatic process, Articular tubercle, Mandibular fossa, Styloid process, Petrotympanic fissure, Carotid canal (external opening), Inferior tympanic canaliculus, External acoustic meatus, Mastoid canaliculus, Mastoid process, Stylomastoid foramen, Petrous part, Mastoid notch, Groove for occipital artery, Jugular fossa, (jugular foramen in its depth), Mastoid foramen.
Calvaria Anatomy

Calvaria Anatomy

Calvaria Anatomy


Calvaria  Superior view : Frontal bone, Coronal suture, Bregma, Parietal bone, Sagittal suture, Parietal foramen (for emissary vein), Lambda, Sutural (wormian) bone, Lambdoid suture, Occipital bone.  Inferior view : Frontal bone, Frontal crest, Groove for superior sagittal sinus, Coronal suture, Parietal bone, Granular foveolae (for arachnoid granulations), Diploë, Grooves for branches of middle meningeal vessels, Sagittal suture, Groove for superior sagittal sinus, Lambdoid suture, Occipital bone.
Superior view : Frontal bone, Coronal suture, Bregma, Parietal bone, Sagittal suture, Parietal foramen (for emissary vein), Lambda, Sutural (wormian) bone, Lambdoid suture, Occipital bone.
Skull: Midsagittal Section Anatomy

Skull: Midsagittal Section Anatomy

Skull: Midsagittal Section Anatomy
Sphenoid bone : Greater wing, Lesser wing, Optic canal, Sella turcica, Anterior clinoid process, Sphenoidal sinus, Body, Medial and lateral plates of pterygoid process.
Skull: Midsagittal Section Anatomy
Temporal bone : Squamous part, Petrous part, Internal acoustic meatus, Lambdoid suture, Groove for superior petrosal sinus, Opening of vestibular aqueduct, Groove for sigmoid sinus, Occipital bone, Groove for transverse sinus, External occipital protuberance (inion), Jugular foramen, Groove for inferior petrosal sinus, Hypoglossal canal, Foramen magnum, Occipital condyle, Basilar part.
The Cell Cycle

The Cell Cycle


The Cell Cycle
Is an orderly sequence of events that occur as a cell duplicates its contents and divides (Fig. 8.1). During the cell cycle, genetic information is duplicated and the duplicated chromosomes are appropriately aligned for distribution between two genetically identical daughter cells.

Cell cycle. The cell cycle’s four step are illustrated beginning with G1 and proceeding to M.

The cell cycle is divided into four phases, referred to as G1 , S, G2 , and M. G1 (gap 1) occurs after the postmitosis phase when DNA synthesis stops and ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein synthesis and cell growth take place. During the S phase, DNA synthesis occurs, causing two separate sets of chromosomes to develop, one for each daughter cell. G2 (gap 2) is the premitotic phase and is similar to G1 in that DNA synthesis stops, but RNA and protein synthesis continue. The phases, G1 , S, and G2 are referred to as interphase. The M phase is the phase of nuclear division, or mitosis, and cytoplasmic division. Continually dividing cells, such as the skin’s stratified squamous epithelium, continue to cycle from one mitotic division to the next. When environmental conditions are adverse, such as nutrient or growth factor unavailability, or when cells are highly specialized, cells may leave the cell cycle, becoming mitotically quiescent, and reside in a resting state known as G0 . Cells in G0 may reenter the cell cycle in response to extracellular nutrients, growth factors, hormones, and other signals such as blood loss or tissue injury that trigger cell growth. Highly specialized and terminally differentiated cells, such as neurons, may permanently stay in G0.
Mitochondrial Gene Disorders

Mitochondrial Gene Disorders


Mitochondrial Gene Disorders
The mitochondria contain their own DNA, which is distinct from the DNA contained in the cell nucleus. There are multiple disease-affected rearrangements and point mutations. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is packaged in a double-stranded circular chromosome located inside the mitochondria. Mitochondrial DNA contains 37 genes: 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and 13 structural genes encoding subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes, which participate in oxidative phosphorylation and generation of adenosine triphosphate.

Mitochondrial Gene Disorders

       In contrast to the mendelian pattern of inheritance of nuclear DNA, disorders of mtDNA are inherited on the maternal line. This can be explained by the fact that ova contain numerous mitochondria in their abundant cytoplasm, whereas spermatozoa contain few, if any, mitochondria. Thus, the mtDNA in the zygote is derived solely from the mother. The zygote and its daughter cells have many mitochondria, each of which contains multiple copies of the maternally derived mtDNA. During growth of the fetus or later, it is likely that some cells will contain only normal or mutant mtDNA (a situation called homoplasmy), whereas others receive a mixture of normal and mutant DNA (heteroplasmy). In turn, the clinical expression of a disease produced by a given mutation of mtDNA depends on the total content of mitochondrial genes and the proportion that is mutant. The fraction of mutant
mtDNA  must  exceed  a  critical  value  for  a  mitochondrial disease to become symptomatic. This threshold varies in different organs and is presumably related to the energy requirements of the cells.
Proprioception And Reflexes

Proprioception And Reflexes

Proprioception And Reflexes
We are aware of the orientation of our limbs with respect to one another, we can perceive the movements of our joints and we can accurately assess the amount of resistance (force) that opposes the movements we make. This ability is called proprioception. The three qualities of this modality are position, movement and force. The receptors or proprioceptors that mediate this modality are principally found in the joint capsules (joint receptors), muscles (muscle spindles) and tendons (Golgi tendon organs).
The joint capsule is compressed or stretched when the joint moves, and mechanoreceptors within it signal the position of the joint, as well as the direction and velocity of the movement. Individual receptors respond to the position of the joint, as well as the direction and the velocity of the movement, but not the force. The receptor types found in the joint capsule are Ruffini-type (slowly adapting) stretch receptors (Chapter 55).
Proprioception And Reflexes

Each muscle contains a number of small muscle fibres (intrafusal muscle fibres: 15–30 μm in diameter and 4–7 mm in length) that are thinner and shorter than the ordinary muscle fibre (extrafusal muscle fibres: 50–100 μm in diameter and varying in length from a few millimetres to many centimetres). Several intrafusal fibres are grouped together and encased in a connective tissue capsule, called the muscle spindle, a specialized receptor that responds to the stretch of a muscle (Fig. 60a). Muscle spindles lie in parallel to the extrafusal muscle fibres and are elongated when the muscle is stretched. The primary sensory innervation of the muscle spindle consists of afferent fibres which wind themselves around the centre of the intrafusal muscle fibres (annulospiral ending). These are large myelinated fibres (group Ia afferents). These endings are called primary sensory endings and, when excited, they evoke a monosynaptic stretch reflex involving an excitation of the homonymous α-motor neurones and reciprocal inhibition of the heteronymous α-motor neurones (Fig. 60b).

Monday, April 5, 2021

The Cytoskeleton

The Cytoskeleton


The Cytoskeleton
Besides its organelles, the cytoplasm contains a network of microtubules, microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and thick filaments (Fig. 4.6). Because they control cell shape and movement, these structures are a major component of the structural elements called the cytoskeleton, which participates in the movement of entire cells.

The Cytoskeleton

Microtubules
Microtubules are formed from protein subunits called tubulin. They are long, stiff, hollow, cylindrical structures, 25 nm in outer diameter with a lumen 15 nm in diameter. Each microtubule consists of parallel protofilaments, each composed of α- and β-tubulin dimers. Microtubules are dynamic structures that can rapidly disassemble in one location and reassemble in another. During the reassembly process the tubulin dimers polymerize in an end-to-end fashion to form protofilaments. As a result of the polymerization process, each microtubule possesses a nongrowing “minus” end and a rapidly growing “plus” end. During the disassembly process, the tubulin dimers dissociate from the protofilaments and form a pool of free tubulin in the cytoplasm. This pool is used in the polymerization process for reassembly of the protofilaments.
The Nucleus

The Nucleus


The Nucleus

The nucleus of the cell appears as a rounded or elongated structure situated near the center of the cell (see Fig. 4.1). All eukaryotic cells have at least one nucleus (prokaryotic cells, such as bacteria, lack a nucleus and nuclear membrane). Some cells contain more than one nucleus; osteoclasts (a type of bone cell) typically contain 12 nuclei or more. The platelet- producing cell, the megakaryocyte, has only one nucleus but usually contains 16 times the normal chromatin amount.
The nucleus can be regarded as the control center for the cell. It contains the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is essential to the cell because its genes encode the information necessary for the synthesis of proteins that the cell must produce to stay alive. These proteins include structural proteins and enzymes used to synthesize other substances, including carbohydrates and lipids. Genes also represent the individual units of inheritance that transmit information from one generation to another. The nucleus also is the site for the synthesis of the three types of ribonucleic acid (messenger RNA [mRNA], ribosomal RNA [rRNA], and transfer RNA [tRNA]) that move to the cytoplasm and carry out the actual synthesis of proteins. mRNA copies and carries the DNA instructions for protein synthesis to the cytoplasm; rRNA is the site of protein synthesis; and tRNA transports amino acids to the site of proteins synthesis for incorporation into the protein being synthesized.
The Nucleus

Chromatin is the term denoting the complex structure of DNA and DNA-associated proteins dispersed in the nuclear matrix. Depending on its transcriptional activity, chromatin may be condensed as an inactive form of chromatin called heterochromatin or extended as a more active form called euchromatin. Because heterochromatic regions of the nucleus stain more intensely than regions consisting of euchromatin, nuclear staining can be a guide to cell activity. Evidence suggests the importance that alteration in the chromatin, along with DNA hypermethylation, in neoplastic progression. It seems both of these processes work symbiotically not separately in their role regarding cancer.
Blood

Blood


Blood
The primary function of blood is to deliver O2 and energy to the tissues, and remove CO2 and waste products. It is also important for the defence and immune systems, regulation of temperature, and trans- port of hormones and signalling molecules between tissues. Blood consists of plasma (Chapter 2) and blood cells. Red blood cells contain haemoglobin and transport respiratory gases (Chapter 28), whereas white cells form part of the defence system (Chapter 10). In adults, all blood cells are produced in the red bone marrow. Normal values for cell counts, haemoglobin and proportion of blood volume due to red cells (haematocrit or packed cell volume; estimated by centrifuging a blood sample) are shown in Figure 8a. Platelets are discussed in Chapter 9.


Blood

Plasma proteins
Plasma contains several important proteins (Fig. 8b), with a total concentration of 65–83 g/L. Most, other than γ-globulins (see below), are synthesized in the liver. Proteins can ionize as either acids or bases because of the presence of both NH2 and COOH groups. At pH 7.4 they are mostly in the anionic (acidic) form. Their ability to accept or donate H+ means they can act as buffers (Chapter 36). Plasma proteins have important transport functions, as they bind many hormones (e.g. cortisol and thyroxine) and metals (e.g. iron). They are classified into albumin, globulin and fibrinogen fractions. Globulins are further classified as α-, β- and γ-globulins. Examples and their major functions are shown in Figure 8b.
Conduction Of Action Potentials

Conduction Of Action Potentials


Conduction Of Action Potentials
The action potential described in Chapter 5 is a local event that can occur in all excitable cells. This local event is an all-or-nothing response, leading to abolishion and then reversal of the polarity from negative (−70 mV) to positive (+40 mV) on the inside of the cell with respect to the outside for a short time during the course of the action potential.
Local currents are set up around the action potential because the positive charges from the membrane ahead of the action potential are drawn towards the area of negativity surrounding the action potential (current sink). This decreases the polarity of the membrane ahead of the action potential.
This electronic depolarization initiates a local response that causes the opening of the voltage-gated ion channels (Na+ followed by K+); when the threshold for firing of the action potential is reached, it propagates the action potential and this, in turn, leads to the local depolarization of the next area, and so on. Once initiated, an action potential does not depolarize the area behind it sufficiently to initiate another action potential because the area is refractory (Chapter 5).
This successive depolarization moves along each segment of an unmyelinated nerve until it reaches the end. It is all-or-nothing and does not decrease in size (Fig. 6a).

Conduction Of Action Potentials

Saltatory conduction
Conduction in myelinated axons depends on a similar pattern of current flows. However, because myelin is an insulator and because the membrane below it cannot be depolarized, the only areas of the myelinated axon that can be depolarized are those that are devoid of any myelin, i.e. at the nodes of Ranvier. The depolarization jumps from one node to another and is called saltatory, from the Latin saltare (to jump) (Fig. 6b). Saltatory conduction is rapid and can be up to 50 times faster than in the fastest unmyelinated fibres.
Neuromuscular Junction And Whole Muscle Contraction

Neuromuscular Junction And Whole Muscle Contraction


Neuromuscular Junction And Whole Muscle Contraction
Neuromuscular junction
For skeletal (voluntary) muscle to contract, there must be neuronal activation to the muscle fibres themselves from either higher centres in the brain or via reflex pathways involving either the spinal cord or the brain stem. The neurones that innervate skeletal muscles are called α-motor neurones. Each motor axon splits into a number of branches that make contact with the surface of individual muscle fibres in the form of bulb-shaped endings. These endings make connections with a specialized structure on the surface of the muscle fibre, called the motor end plate, and together form the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) (Fig. 13a).
The role of the NMJ is the one-to-one transmission of excitatory impulses from the α-motor neurone to the muscle fibres it innervates. It allows a reliable transmission of the impulses from nerve to muscle and produces a predictable response in the muscle. In other words, an action potential in the motor neurone must produce an action potential in the muscle fibres it innervates; this, in turn, must produce a contraction of the muscle fibres. The process by which the NMJ produces this one-to-one response is shown in Figures 13a and b.

The motor neurone axon terminal has a large number of vesicles containing the transmitter substance acetylcholine (ACh). At rest, when not stimulated, a small number of these vesicles release their contents, by a process called exocytosis, into the synaptic cleft between the neurones and the muscle fibres. ACh diffuses across the cleft and reacts with specific ACh receptor proteins in the postsynaptic mem- brane (motor end plate). These receptors contain an integral ion channel, which opens and allows the movement inwards (influx) of small cations, mainly Na+. There are more than 107 receptors on each end plate (postjunctional membrane); each of these can open for about 1 ms and allow small positively charged ions to enter the cell. This movement of positively charged ions generates an end plate potential (EPP). This is a depolarization of the cell with a rise-time of approximately 1–2 ms and may vary in amplitude (unlike the all- or-nothing response seen in the action potential; Chapter 6). The random release of ACh from the vesicles at rest gives rise to small, 0–4-mV depolarizations of the end plate, called miniature end plate potentials (MEPP) (Fig. 13c).

However, when an action potential reaches the prejunctional nerve terminal, there is an enhanced permeability of the membrane to Ca2+ ions due to opening of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. This causes an increase in the exocytotic release of ACh from several hundred vesicles at the same time. This sudden volume of ACh diffuses across the cleft and stimulates a large number of receptors on the postsynaptic membrane, and thus produces an EPP that is above the threshold for triggering an action potential in the muscle fibre. It triggers a self- propagating muscle action potential. The depolarizing current (the generator potential) generated by the numbers of quanta of ACh is more than sufficient to cause the initiation of an action potential in the muscle membrane surrounding the postsynaptic junction. The typical summed EPP is usually four times the potential necessary to trigger an action potential in the muscle fibre, and so there is a large inherent safety factor.
The effect of ACh is rapidly abolished by the activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). ACh is hydrolysed to choline and acetic acid. About one-half of the choline is recaptured by the presynaptic nerve terminal and used to make more ACh. Some ACh diffuses out of the cleft, but the enzyme destroys most of it. The number of vesicles available in the nerve ending is said to be sufficient for only about 2000 nerve–muscle impulses, and therefore the vesicles reform very rapidly within about 30 s (Fig. 13b).

Neuromuscular Junction And Whole Muscle Contraction

Whole muscle contraction
As the action potential spreads over the muscle fibre, it invades the T-tubules and releases Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum into the sarcoplasm, and the muscle fibres that are excited contract. This contraction will be maintained as long as the levels of Ca2+ are high. The single contraction of a muscle due to a single action potential is called a muscle twitch. Fibres are divided into fast and slow twitch fibres depending on the time course of their twitch contraction. This is determined by the type of myosin in the muscles and the amount of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Different muscles are made up of different proportions of these two types of fibre, leading to a huge variation in overall muscle contraction times (Fig. 3d).

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